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Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge
Five Rivers Lodge

Details

  • Fresh Water
  • Season

    April - October
  • The 2017 rate per angler based on two anglers sharing a guide and room is $2395 4 nights/ 3 days guided fishing, $4095 for 7 nights/6 days guided fishing. Single rooms are an additional $125 per night per person and single guide is an additional $240 per day.
  • Number of guests

    The lodge takes up to 28 guests/anglers, but can accommodate larger private groups
  • Species:
    • Rainbow Trout
    • Brown Trout

Five Rivers Lodge

United States >> Montana >> Dillon
Fishing and Species
The lodge is named Five Rivers after the five rivers they fish in the area, Beaverhead, Bighole, Madison, Jefferson and Ruby. In addition they fish some private spring creeks, a private pond with cruisers and private water on the Beaverhead and Bighole. The guiding is outstanding and the diversity of water is a fly fishers dream. You will fish for rainbows and browns.

As the name says, Five Rivers Lodge is indeed located in the middle of five outstanding trout rivers: the Beaverhead, Big Hole, Ruby, Jefferson and Madison. In addition, there are spring creeks and ponds that are home to some huge trout. No matter what time of the season it is, there is always water that is fishing well. The lodge was designed around the panoramic view of the Beaverhead Valley. The large guest rooms have queen or king beds and a private bath. After a day of fishing, guests can enjoy a drink or a glass of wine with appetizers in one of the two living areas. The Lodge’s library has hundreds of books on fly fishing Montana, cooking and Montana wildlife.

Beginning and experienced anglers alike will enjoy fishing these rivers. Birds, waterfowl, wildlife, and wildflowers are abundant in this mountainous section of the Lewis and Clark trail, located in southwest Montana.

Their experienced chefs want the cuisine to include your favorites and cater to individual diets. The food and wine are excellent. Extensive lodge gardens grow vegetables and herbs used in the daily cooking.

Private Access Waters
You will enjoy fishing miles of private wading access on spring creeks and rivers. Very large brown trout inhabit the rivers and spring creeks, many 24" to 26" long. Anglers regularly hook eight to ten fish a day over 20". The area is divided into seven sections and two anglers are allowed to fish each section only once every seven days. Sight casting for cruisers in the private ponds can be a lot of fun.

Beaverhead River
The 69-mile-long journey of the Beaverhead River begins at the outlet of the Clark Canyon Reservoir. Its waters are divided into two distinct sections with unique fishing conditions, and it joins the Big Hole River at Twin Bridges, Montana to form the Jefferson River. The number of fish per mile and their size are legendary.

Big Hole River
Free flowing its entire course, the Big Hole river extends 153 miles from its modest beginnings at Skinner Lake in the Beaverhead Mountains of southwest Montana to its confluence with the Beaverhead River near Twin Bridges. The hatches are thick and the float is scenic.

Ruby River 
The Ruby River begins in the Gravelly Range of southwest Montana and flows into Ruby Reservoir. Below the reservoir, it flows into a valley that lies between the Ruby Range to the south and the Tobacco Root mountains to the north. The river ends at the confluence of the Jefferson River at Twin Bridges, Montana. The lodge has some great water to fish here.

Madison River
The Madison River originates in Yellowstone National Park at the junction of the Firehole and Gibbon rivers and flows in a northerly direction for 140 miles to Three Forks, Montana, where it joins the Jefferson and Gallatin rivers to form the Missouri River. It is prolific with fish and bugs.

Jefferson River
The Jefferson River begins near Twin Bridges with the confluence of the Beaverhead, Big Hole and Ruby Rivers. It flows more than 80 miles to its confluence with the Missouri River at Missouri River Headwaters State Park. When the Jeff is on, you should fish it.