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Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia
Mongolia

Details

  • Fresh Water
  • Season

    May - June and September - October
  • The 2017 rate is $6300 for the spring season and fall season. In addition there is a $330 license fee.
  • Number of guests

    There are 2 camps about 4 hours by jetboat apart. Each camp takes 8 anglers.
  • Species:
    • Taimen
    • Lenok Trout

Mongolia

Mongolia >> Ulaanbatar >> Ulaanbatar
Fishing and Species
Taimen (Hucho hucho taimen) are an especially ferocious fish that can attain weights of well over 100 pounds. On the rivers to be fished in Mongolia, the average taimen is around 32 inches and roughly 10 pounds. However, almost every week fishermen will have chances on fish over 50 inches. Catch and release is required on all taimen.Taimen are an aggressive fish that will eat anything they can fit in their mouth. During the 1996 exploratory, one of the guides demonstrated how Mongolians fish for taimen with prairie dogs. After shooting a prairie dog and rigging the bait, the guide cast out his prairie dog and reeled it back as fast as possible. The result was incredible. A 45-inch taimen came out of the water and slammed the bait. Fortunately for fly fishermen, a simple mouse pattern will suffice in bringing these huge fish to the surface. Streamer patterns on either a sink tip or floating line also work well. In the past, fishermen have resorted to wets after refusals on mice, poppers, etc. Lenok (Brachymstax Lenok) are the Mongolian equivalent of a trout. In appearance they look like a rainbow trout with the mouth of a tarpon. These fish rely on the prolific caddis and mayfly hatches, and terrestrials such as grasshoppers and crickets. Lenok average 18-20 inches long and are very entertaining on lighter fly rods. Larger lenok will dine on mice patterns and streamers. As one fisherman, later dubbed as “Lord Lenok,” put it: “Why on earth would you cast gerbil flies for a fish like taimen that are so huge and difficult to bring in when you can sight cast normal dries to 20 – 28 inch lenok?” Arctic Grayling (Thymallus arcticus) are, to put it simply, scared. The rivers are full of grayling of all sizes. During hatches, two things become apparent; one, the rivers of Mongolia are full of 12 – 18 inch grayling; two, taimen consider grayling an arctic delicacy. Still, like the lenok, they provide good sport and action on dries.

Sweetwater Travel pioneered Taimen fishing in Mongolia. After 15 successful seasons, and hundreds of happy fishermen, Mongolia remains one of the most unique fly fishing destinations in the world. Sweetwater has refined its operation and offers unrivalled expertise and comfort for the fly fisherman. After all, if you are traveling all the way to Mongolia to fish, why wouldn’t you fish with the only group of guides who have been in Mongolia every year since 1995?

The average size taimen is just under 30 inches. Their largest fish of 2010 was a 59-inch beast landed by Marles Frankman of Minneapolis, Minnesota. This was Mrs. Frankman's second trip to Mongolia, and during her week she landed two fish over 55 inches, one of which is the new world record for Taimen on the fly. This marks the third time the world record for Taimen has been broken at our camps in Mongolia. Simply put, there is no other place in Mongolia where you have a better chance to catch, and release, the fish of a lifetime.

The Lenok Trout fishing was outstanding in 2010. It offers a great terrestrial hatch in late summer, and the traditional mayfly hatch in the fall. For most, just the opportunity to experience a pristine landscape, undeveloped river valleys lined with healthy forests, or a pair of Mongolian riders driving their stock through a river meadow on a crisp fall morning is enough. But for the fly fisherman, Mongolia makes a great trip even better; it is home to the world’s largest trout that will attack your skated dry flies.

Access to the waters is by 18’ jet boats. Most of the fishing is done by wading, but certain runs fish best from the boat. Anglers must fish only single, barbless hooks, and all of the fishing is catch and release. The river is managed for sustainability and to ensure that all of the guests have the fishing trip of a lifetime.

Accommodations are in roomy 18-foot-diameter traditional Mongolian gers. Two anglers share each ger, which has two single beds.